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Single Vineyard Perfection: A Brief History

If you’re want to understand the importance of single vineyard wines, a look at the history of winemaking in Burgundy is the best place to start. No other region in the world has studied more closely how grapes perform in different terroirs. Indeed the very concept of terroir – the idea that the micro-climate, soil characteristics, exposure and orientation of each particular site determine the character of the wine – originated in Burgundy.

As the Burghound.com’s Allen Meadows explained at the Melbourne Food and Wine Festival Masterclass Single Vineyard Perfection, the Catholic religious orders, who managed the Burgundian vineyards from about 600 AD up to the end of the 18th century, noticed that different plots created wines with unique personalities. They believed that these individual expressions were in fact celebrating messages from God. (Meadows also noted that the idea of a single grape variety for a single vineyard came about because the monks didn’t want to muddle God’s message!)

In medieval times the Cistercian Order classified the best vineyard sites of Burgundy’s famous golden slope, the Côte d’Or, laying the foundation for the current classification of five levels, ranging from Grand Crus (only 2% of the Côte d’Or vineyards) at the top of the pyramid to the regional and sub-regional appellations at the bottom.

Today the classification system in Burgundy is firmly entrenched and unlike Bordeaux, where the wines are classified according to the reputation of the producer, the hierarchy in Burgundy is still geographically based. The Grand Crus Côte de Beaune vineyard of Montrachet, for example, is still widely considered the best vineyard in the world for chardonnay. The almost 8 hectare (19 acres) vineyard is home to 18 owners and 26 producers!

In recent years Australian and other New World producers have embraced the idea of single vineyard wines to celebrate terroirs that have enough unique characteristics to produce a wine of distinction. In fact, James Halliday argues that the focus on single-vineyard and single-region wines is a “path that more and more Australian wine producers must follow if we are to fundamentally change the negative perceptions of domestic and (most significantly) export markets about the diversity, the quality and the style of our wines, and of our aspirations for the future.” (James Halliday, Australian Wine Companion 2011 Edition).

Meadows noted that you need at least 15 years of experience to gauge the effect of vineyard specificity on the quality of a wine, so the process of designating Australia’s greatest vineyards is still in its infancy. The good news, however, is that the pursuit of single vineyard perfection is leading to an unrelenting focus on quality both in the vineyard and in the winery!

Photo: Joseph Drouhin Clos des Mouches vineyard

 

 

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