Tag: Curly Flat Pinot Noir 2006

Jun 06 2011

Cellaring Australian Pinot Noir: How long do they last?

Posted on June 06, 2011 | By merrill@cellarit.com

When I was researching my previous post on Australian pinot noir, Australian Pinot Noir: Coming into Its Own, I came across a list by Andrew Graham of the Australia Wine Journal entitled Australia’s 10 most ageworthy Pinot Noirs.

The list caused quite a bit of commentary and debate, and I have reprinted Graham’s recommendations here: Mount Mary Pinot Noir, Yarra Yering Pinot Noir, Bannockburn Serré Pinot Noir, By Farr Sangreal Pinot Noir, Ashton Hills Reserve Pinot Noir, Bass Phillip Estate Pinot Noir, Domaine A Pinot Noir, Stonier Reserve Pinot Noir, Kooyong Ferrous Pinot Noir and Bindi Block 5 Pinot Noir. You can read Graham’s very insightful comments for why each of the wines were chosen on his blog.

Graham defines ageworthy “as the ability to mature, and indeed improve, with cellaring times for 8 years plus.” Like many of the readers who responded to his post, I wouldn’t necessarily think of ageing Australian pinot noir for so long. One reader commented: “I suspect most people drink them too young and miss out on the aged versions. What do most folk think about optimal age for decent Pinot Noir? I’d say 5-10y which is medium term vs Shiraz / Cab Sav.”

I was curious what an esteemed, if sometimes controversial, wine critic thinks about the longevity of pinot noir. Here’s Robert Parker’s 1995 assessment of the ageability of American pinot noir: “Most American Pinot Noirs should be consumed within their first 5-7 years of life. As most Burgundy collectors sadly acknowledge (provided they can honestly accept the distressing reality), once beyond the wines of Domaine Leroy, Domain Ponsot, and ten or so others, great red burgundy is also a wine to drink young.” (Robert Parker, American Pinot Comes of Age, Wine … Read the rest

Nov 11 2010

A Brilliant BYO Dinner!

Posted on November 11, 2010 | By merrill@cellarit.com

If you love great wine and food, one of life’s great pleasures is to organise a group dinner at a favourite restaurant that allows BYO, and ask each of the diners to bring one of their best bottles.

On Thursday night we attended such a dinner at the fine French restaurant La Grande Bouffe in Rozelle. Organised by my husband’s Food and Wine Society, I knew the wine selections were going to be pretty good (the table captain had been in touch with key members of our table in advance of the evening) but, wow, what a wonderful night of wine imbibing!

We started with a bottle of Perrier-Jouet Champagne 1998. Fresh and still fruity with delicate citrus and floral aromas and deliciously fine bubbles, it was the perfect accompaniment to the canapes of natural oysters with a champagne vinaigrette, fish tartare on fine toast and pork roulard with celeraic salsa.

Before the entrees arrived, we moved on to the Domain Christian Moreau Pere et Fils Chablis 1er Cru Vaillon 2006. This wine comes from a very young domain: the Christian Moreau family only reclaimed the grand cru-rich acreage for the family in 2002, and Christian and his winemaker son Fabien have already done a very good job in restoring the Domaine’s reputation as a leading producer in the region.

The 2006 Vaillon Chablis is made from vines planted by Guy Moreau in 1932. It was already excellent but will probably benefit with more cellar age, which will soften the slight steely edge. The stone fruit, apricot in particular, and lime citrus flavours were balanced by lanolin in the finish. It worked well with my twice baked wonderfully light leak and goat cheese souflee and my husband’s deliciously succulent bacon wrapped scallops on braised mushrooms with a mustard jus.

Now … Read the rest