Tag: NSW Wine Awards

Nov 11 2010

Part 2, The Riverina Shines with Some of the Best Botrytised Wines!

Posted on November 11, 2010 | By merrill@cellarit.com

In my previous post, Botrytised Dessert Wines: Part 1, The Alchemy Process!, I mentioned how important climate was for activating the dormant spores of botrytis cinera on the grapes to create the noble rot that is necessary for making wonderfully fragrant and flavourful sweet wine.

Fortunately, Australia’s Riverina shares many climatic similarities with Sauternes, the celebrated French sweet wine region and home of one of the most famous wines in the world, Chateau D’Yquem.

Like Sauternes, the Riverina experiences early morning frost and fog late in the growing season, allowing the all important botrytised mould to develop on the grapes. While the nights are cool, the warm, dry days when intermingled with just the right amount of humidity from light rains encourage the development of the noble rot.

Australia’s most lauded botrytised wine, De Bortoli Noble One, was one of the first botrytised wines produced in the Riverina and is still a benchmark for the style. Created by Darren De Bortoli at the family winery in Bilbul, this year the winery celebrated the 25th vintage of this famous wine with the release of the the 2007 vintage.

Since 2000 the wine has been made by De Bortoli  senior executive winemaker Julie Mockton. A blend of French oaked and un-oaked botrytis semillon, Noble One shares all the hallmarks of a great Sauternes. Typically bright gold in colour, this rich, opulent wine exhibits fresh and complex aromas ranging from peach, cumquat, nectarine and floral honey complemented with hints of well integrated sweet vanillin oak. The palate is rich, vibrant and luscious with layers of flavour including apricot, peach, citrus and subtle French oak.

Under the direction of winemaker Rob Fiumara, Lillypilly Estate also makes a very fine and reasonably priced sweet wine. The Lillypilly Estate Noble Blend 2008 (rrp … Read the rest

Oct 10 2010

Orange: NSW’s ‘Coolest’ Wine Region!

Posted on October 10, 2010 | By merrill@cellarit.com


First Press reports that this year’s 2010 NSW Wine Awards is shaping up as a contest between the new emerging cool climate regions of NSW and the traditional regions of the Hunter Valley and the Riverina. The emerging cool climate regions of the Canberra district, Orange, Hilltops, Tumbarumba and the Southern Highlands took roughly half of the spots in the Top NSW 40 Wines, Cool-Climate Continues to Captivate Judges, First Press Newsletter 1 October 2010. The top 40 NSW wines were selected from over 800 entries by a panel of highly respected wine judges chaired by Huon Hooke.

 

The region of Orange has certainly emerged as a clear winner at this year’s Awards regardless of whether it picks up the ultimate prize of 2010 NSW Wine of the Year to be announced at the Awards Gala Presentation dinner at Guillame at Bennelong on Monday 18 October 2010. Five of its wineries are in the top 40 and its wines took out two of the nine trophies: Angullong Wines Sauvignon Blanc 2010 rrp $17 won the trophy for best young sauvignon blanc and Logan Cabernet Merlot 2008 rrp $25 won the trophy for best young red blend.

The Orange wine region is about 260 km west of Sydney. Noteworthy for its very high elevation, it is also one the coolest growing environments in Australia. Orange is dominated by the extinct volcano Mt Canobolas, which provides rich volcanic soils and moderates the hot summer temperatures to create one of the longest ripening periods in Australia – grapes are typically not picked until mid to late autumn. The combination of aged soils, high altitude, cool temperatures, ample sunshine, decent rainfall and long dry autumns, typically produce wines that have been recognised for their complexity, elegance and balance.

Wine critic Max Allen … Read the rest